Stephanie Cerce

scc412@lehigh.edu
Lehigh University Psychology - student, Stephanie Cerce
 
Academic History
M.S. Social Psychology (May 2014)
Thesis: “People are Neither Compatibilists Nor Incompatibilists: They Maintain Distinct, Inconsistent Intuitions Regarding Determinism and Moral Responsibility”
Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA
 
B.A. Psychology & History (May 2011)
Summa Cum Laude
Honors Thesis: “Evolutionary Value of Self-Deception? The Effects of Self-Deception on Ability to Deceive Others”
Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
 
Research Interests
My research interests broadly pertain to moral decision-making, including the psychology of blame and punishment. Much of my work focuses on how knowledge of a transgressor’s upbringing and personal history (i.e., historicist narrative) influences blame and punishment responses. While much extant research focuses on the strong link between intentionality and blame, we find that historicist narratives effectively mitigate blame – even for intentional transgressions. My dissertation is aimed at implementing historicist narrative interventions in novel populations, including in romantic relationships and for individuals with depression (two groups for whom blame practices can have disastrous outcomes). My research is guided by an intrinsic goal of improving the lives of individuals (and partners) by fostering understanding and reducing harsh blame responses.
 
Publications
Gill, M. J., & Cerce, S. C. (2017). He never willed to have the will he has: Historicist narratives, “civilized” blame, and the need to distinguish two notions of free will. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology112(3), 361.
 
Manuscripts 
Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (submitted) Validating the Moral Outrage Battery (MOB): Assessing individual differences in the propensity to respond harshly to others’ misdeeds. 

Gill, M. J., Cerce, S., & M. R., Andreychik (submitted) Compassion for a Victim or Contempt for a Loser?: Relational Construals Moderate Responses to Uncontrollable Bad Acts.

Conference Presentations
Thalla, N. T., Cerce, S. C. & Packer, D. J. (March 2018) The effect of intentionality on perceptions of moral wrongness in purity and harm violations.Poster presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (Jan 2017) Why would an offender's history temper blame? A test of the "sympathy hypothesis". Poster presented at the Justice & Morality Preconference for the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (May 2016) Reducing blame for intentional transgressors by priming historicist explanations. Poster presented at the Association for Psychological Science Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (March 2016) When will an offender’s unfortunate history temper blame? The crucial role of causal sufficiency. Paper presented at the Eastern Psychological Association Annual Meeting, New York, NY.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (January 2016) Not all historicist narratives attenuate blame: Causal sufficiency matters. Poster presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA.

Packer, D., Gill, M., Cerce, S. & Van Bavel, J. (January 2016) How consistent contributors influence cooperation in groups. Talk presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (March 2015) Reducing blame for intentional transgressors: The role of character implantation. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (February 2015) Undermining perceptions of free will via character implantation can break the link between perceived intentionality and blame. Poster presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA.

Gill, M. J., Cerce, S., & Ungson, N. D. (October 2014). Cooling down blame: Historicist narratives and the tempering of blame for intentional harms.Paper presented at annual meeting of the Person Memory Interest Group, College Corner, Ohio. 

Gill, M. J., Cerce, S., & Ungson, N. (June 2014). From retributive impulses to understanding and compassion: Historicist narratives and the blaming of intentional harmdoers. In Dominic J. Packer & Jay Van Bavel (Chairs), The flexibility of morality. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the International Society for Justice Research, New York, NY. 

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (March 2014) Undermining perceptions of “second-order” free will via historical information about a transgressor disconnects perceived intentionality from blame. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

Cerce, S. & Gill, M. (February 2014) Breaking the link between intentional harm and blame: the role of perceived character implantation. Poster accepted to the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Meeting, Austin, TX.

Cerce, S. & Wilder, D. (March 2012) Evolutionary Value of Self-Deception? The Effects of Self-Deception on Ability to Deceive Others. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA.

Ahmad, S., Ashokkumar, P., & Cerce, S. (April 2009). Globalization, Ethnic Diversity, and Democracy: Sectarian Identities in India, Spain, Turkey, Lebanon, and Iraq. Poster presented at The Aresty Research 5thAnnual University-wide Research Symposium, New Brunswick, NJ.

Fellowships and Grants
2017   Recipient of the College of Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Research Grant
2016   Recipient of the Doctoral Travel Grant for Global Opportunities
2015   Recipient of the Forum Student Research Grant
2013   Awarded Dale Strohl Graduate Summer Research Fellowship